James McMurtry, July 22 @ the Bouquet

James McMurtry born March 18, 1962 in Fort Worth, TX is a Texas rock and Americana music singer, songwriter, guitarist, bandleader and occasional actor Daisy Miller, Lonesome Dove. He performs with veteran bandmates and rhythm section The Heartless Bastards (Darren Hess and Ronnie Johnson – not to be confused with the Cincinnati, OH, band of the same name).

His father, novelist Larry McMurtry, gave him his first guitar at age seven. His mother, an English professor, taught him how to play it: “My mother taught me three chords and the rest I just stole as I went along. I learned everything by ear or by watching people.”

McMurtry spent the first seven years of his boyhood in Ft. Worth[2] but was raised mostly in Leesburg, Virginia. He attended the Woodberry Forest School, Orange, Virginia. He began performing in his teens, writing bits and pieces. He started performing his own songs at a downtown beer garden while studying English and Spanish at the University of Arizona in Tucson. After traveling to Alaska and playing a few gigs, he returned to Texas and his father’s “little bitty ranch house crammed with 10,000 books”. After a time, he left for San Antonio, where he worked as a house painter, actor, bartender, and sometimes singer, performing at writer’s nights and open mics.

In 1987 McMurtry’s career entered an upswing. A friend in San Antonio suggested McMurtry enter the New Folk songwriter contest; he became one of six winners that year. Also around this time John Mellencamp was starring in a film based on a script by McMurtry’s father, which gave McMurtry the opportunity to get a demo tape to Mellencamp. Mellencamp subsequently served as co-producer on McMurtry’s 1989 debut album, Too Long in the Wasteland. McMurtry also appeared on the soundtrack of the film Falling from Grace, working with Mellencamp, John Prine, Joe Ely, and Dwight Yoakam in a “supergroup” called Buzzin’ Cousins.

McMurtry released follow-up albums in Candyland (1992) and Where’d You Hide the Body (1995). Walk Between the Raindrops followed in 1998 and 2002 brought St. Mary of the Woods. In April 2004, McMurtry released a tour album called Live In Aught-Three.

In 2005, McMurtry released his first studio album in three years. Childish Things again received high critical praise, winning the song and album of the year at the 5th Annual Americana Awards in Nashville, Tennessee. The album was perhaps McMurtry at his most political, as his working-class anthem “We Can’t Make It Here” included direct criticism of George W. Bush, the Iraq War, and Wal-Mart. The music critic Robert Christgau ranked “We Can’t Make It Here” as the best song of the 2000s.[3]

McMurtry released his follow up album to Childish Things in April 2008. Just Us Kids continued with the previous album’s political themes and included the song Cheney’s Toy, McMurtry’s most direct criticism of George W. Bush so far. Like We Can’t Make It Here from the previous album, Cheney’s Toy was made available as a free Internet download.

McMurtry currently resides in Austin, Texas. When in Austin McMurtry and The Heartless Bastards play a midnight set at The Continental Club on Wednesday nights. He is usually preceded by another Austin roots rock legend, Jon Dee Graham.[citation needed]

James McMurty at The Bouquet – Friday, July 22nd with Guest Johnny Burke
$15 ADV/$18 DOOR. 21+. No smoking. Full bar. Doors open at 7:00 p.m. Showtime is 8:00 p.m. General admission.
Tickets avail at 10a on Friday, May 27th at egyptiantheatre,net, The Record Exchange, The Boise Co-op, and Egyptian Theatre box office. Charge by phone at 208-387-1273 Tues-Sat from 11a to 6p.

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